All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Remembering U.S. Colored Troops

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Saturday, April 20, 2013

Scholars discuss the contributions of U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War and how they are remembered at various battle sites. The panel also takes a critical look at the characterization of black troops in the 1989 film “Glory,” which focuses on the 54th Massachusetts – one of the first all-black units to fight for the Union. This event was part of a conference at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania.

Updated: Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 7:36pm (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Photos of African American Soldiers
Saturday, March 16, 2013     

This is a look at the names, people and stories behind the photographs of black Americans who fought for the Union. Ron Coddington -- author of the book “African American Faces of the Civil War” – details their contributions to the war effort.  The New York Public Library hosted this discussion.

The Civil War: African American Soldiers & Emancipation
Saturday, May 4, 2013     

The Catoctin Center for Regional Studies hosted a two-day conference on African Americans and the Civil War at Frederick Community College in Maryland. In this program, you'll hear first from historian James McPherson, who examines the reasons for recruiting black soldiers for the war effort. He also discusses the shift from fighting to preserve the Union to fighting to end slavery. Then, Columbia University history professor Barbara Fields looks at racism and slavery during the Civil War era and the motives behind emancipation.
 

The Civil War: Cincinnati’s Black Brigade & the Abolition Movement
Saturday, July 14, 2012     

Two speakers make presentations at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium. First, author Nikki Taylor addresses the issue of citizenship among free African Americans, and the story of Cincinnati’s Black Brigade. Then, history professor Diane Barnes talks about the abolition movement.

The Civil War: Lincoln, Douglass & U.S. Colored Troops
Saturday, March 9, 2013     

A panel of scholars talks about the contributions and sacrifices of African Americans who served in the U.S. Colored Troops. This discussion also includes a look at the role abolitionist Frederick Douglass played in the recruitment of black soldiers, and their eventual acceptance into the Union Army by President Lincoln and his generals. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event.

Lectures in History: Emancipation & U.S. Colored Troops
Saturday, August 25, 2012     

History professor Roger Davidson discusses emancipation and U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War. Professor Davidson explains how African Americans used the disorder caused by the Civil War to escape enslavement. He also details how former slaves offered their services to Union forces to help bring about the end of slavery. This class took place at Coppin State University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Today     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

The Civil War: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston & the Atlanta Campaign
Saturday, April 12, 2014     

Author and historian Richard McMurry talks about the Civil War career of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, up to and through his command of the Army of Tennessee and the Atlanta Campaign in the spring and summer of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.
 

The Civil War: 1864 Union Raid on Richmond
Saturday, April 5, 2014     

The Museum of the Confederacy's Kelly Hancock talks about a Union raid on the Confederate capital in late February and early March of 1864. Among several goals of the operation was the rescue of Union prisoners of war. The efforts proved unsuccessful; and over the course of the raid’s unraveling, one of the commanding officers, Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, was killed. A set of papers found on his body contained orders to burn the city of Richmond and kill Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his cabinet. The papers’ discovery set off a brief firestorm in both the South and the North over the source and authenticity of the orders.

The Civil War: Hampton Roads & Other Peace Negotiations
Saturday, March 29, 2014     

In this program, author James Conroy explores the Hampton Roads Peace Conference as well as previous attempts at compromise between political leaders from the North and South. Mr. Conroy is the author of “Our One Common Country:  Abraham Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Peace Conference of 1865.” This presentation includes many photographs from the Civil War that have been recently colorized and are courtesy of www.civilwarincolor.com. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

The Civil War: Person of the Year 1864
Thursday, March 20, 2014     

Historian John Marszalek's nomination of William Tecumseh Sherman won Person of the Year 1864 at a recent symposium in Richmond, Virginia. He joined us LIVE on Saturday, March 22, 2014, to take viewer phone calls about Sherman's life and career, his leadership in taking the city of Atlanta in early September 1864, and his "March to the Sea" later in the year. Marszalek is the author of three books about Sherman.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Gifts (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org