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The Civil War: Remembering U.S. Colored Troops

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Saturday, April 20, 2013

Scholars discuss the contributions of U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War and how they are remembered at various battle sites. The panel also takes a critical look at the characterization of black troops in the 1989 film “Glory,” which focuses on the 54th Massachusetts – one of the first all-black units to fight for the Union. This event was part of a conference at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania.

Updated: Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 7:36pm (ET)

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