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The Civil War: Race & Military Tradition

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Saturday, November 24, 2012

Author and historian Mark Grimsley explains how American military conflicts through history have contributed to the formation and understanding of racial identities. He discusses the roles of African Americans on both the Union and Confederate sides of the Civil War. Mr. Grimsley spoke at the 2012 Civil War Institute Conference at Gettysburg College.

Updated: Sunday, November 25, 2012 at 2:56pm (ET)

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