All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg

View of Pickett's Charge from the Confederate Lines (Edwin Forbes)

View of Pickett's Charge from the Confederate Lines (Edwin Forbes)

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Wednesday, July 3, 2013

This year, the annual summer conference hosted by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College focused on the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. In this program, Civil War historians analyze Confederate commander Robert E. Lee’s decision to order an assault on the Union center, often referred to as Pickett’s Charge. The Confederate attack carried out by Gen. George Pickett - one of the three Confederate generals who lead the assault - occurred on July 3, 1863, the third and final day of the Battle of Gettysburg. About 12,500 Confederate soldiers advanced through an open field under heavy Union artillery, resulting in severe casualties and a decisive defeat that ended the battle and Lee’s campaign into Pennsylvania.
 

Updated: Monday, July 15, 2013 at 2:05pm (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Battle of Gettysburg - Day 1
Saturday, February 9, 2013     

Historians Craig Symonds, James McPherson and Harold Holzer discuss the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. The three-day battle fought in Pennsylvania from July 1st through 3rd, 1863, was the bloodiest of the war, resulting in an estimated 51 thousand total casualties. This is the first in a two-part series on the battle, hosted by the New-York Historical Society.

The Civil War: Battle of Gettysburg - Days 2 & 3
Saturday, June 15, 2013     

Historians John Marszalek and James McPherson examine the Battle of Gettysburg, with a focus on the second and third days of the fighting. The three-day battle fought in Pennsylvania from July 1-3, 1863, was the bloodiest of the war -- resulting in an estimated 51,000 total casualties -- and many historians consider it to be the turning point of the Civil War. Harold Holzer, chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation Chairman, moderates the discussion. This is the second in a two-part series on the battle hosted by the New-York Historical Society.
 

The Civil War: Lincoln & the Gettysburg Address
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

Two scholars at the American Enterprise Institute discuss Steven Spielberg’s film “Lincoln.” They also talk about the former president’s Gettysburg Address and answer questions from students.

"Receding Tide: Vicksburg and Gettysburg"
Saturday, November 6, 2010     

Noted battlefield tour leader and former chief historian of the National Park Service, Edwin Bearss, speaks at the National Archives about his latest book, "Receding Tide: Vicksburg and Gettysburg, the Campaigns that Changed the Civil War."

The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary
Tuesday     

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

The Civil War: Slavery & Cinema
Saturday     

A panel of history professors traces the evolution of slavery as depicted in film since the 1930s. Drawing examples from films like “Mandingo,” “Amistad” and “12 Years a Slave,” panelists discuss how filmmakers have framed the idea of slavery. They also describe changes in race relations and gender portrayals in films and how slave characters have shifted from the background into leading roles. 

The Civil War: Battle of the Crater 150th Anniversary
Saturday, August 9, 2014     

A National Park Service event at Petersburg National Battlefield commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of the Crater and honoring the U.S. Colored Troops' role in the fighting. The Battle of the Crater took place on July 30, 1864, as part of the Siege of Petersburg. The ceremony includes the unveiling of a stamp by the U.S. Postal Service and remarks by historian James Blankenship, who details the major events of the battle. 

War Crimes Trial of Henry Wirz
Saturday, July 26, 2014     

Swiss-born Confederate Captain Henry Wirz was in charge of the Andersonville prisoner-of-war camp, where some 13,000 of approximately 45,000 Union prisoners died while being held there. Author and law professor Paul Finkelman discusses the military trial and execution of Henry Wirz and the concept of war crimes that were established as a result of the trial. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society.

The Civil War: Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood
Saturday, July 26, 2014     

Stephen Hood discusses his book on the military career, personal life and legacy of Confederate General John Bell Hood. The author -- a distant relative of the general -- analyzes John Bell Hood’s actions at Gettysburg, Chickamauga and Antietam by delving into letters and medical records recently released by Hood’s descendents. He says that many of the Hood’s controversial acts are clarified or redeemed through an examination of the documents. 

The Life & Execution of Timothy Webster
Saturday, July 19, 2014     

Author Corey Recko discusses the life and death of Timothy Webster, a former policeman who spied for the Union during the Civil War. Webster was renowned as the Union's top spy until he was betrayed in 1862, and he was the first spy executed during the war. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
Sundays at Eight - New Book
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org