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The Civil War: Photographs of Robert E. Lee

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, May 3, 2014

Author Donald Hopkins talks about his book, “Robert E. Lee in War and Peace,” in which he details his research into all of the known photographs of Robert E. Lee. The Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia hosted this event.

Updated: Sunday, May 4, 2014 at 10:40am (ET)

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