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The Civil War: Northern Weapons Manufacturing

Federal rifles after siege of Petersburg, April 3, 1865; Library of Congress

Federal rifles after siege of Petersburg, April 3, 1865; Library of Congress

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 1, 2012

MIT professor Merritt Roe Smith delivers the keynote address of the 2012 Smithsonian Institution’s “Technology and the Civil War” symposium. He talks about the North’s weapons production and manufacturing industry, and how that gave the Union an advantage over the Confederacy.

Updated: Monday, December 3, 2012 at 11:14am (ET)

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