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The Civil War: New York City Orthopedic Medicine

Private Milton Wallen wounded on July 4, 1863 by a Minie ball

Private Milton Wallen wounded on July 4, 1863 by a Minie ball

New York City
Saturday, March 15, 2014

Dr. David Levine discusses orthopedic medicine in New York City from the Civil War to the turn of the 20th century. He talks about a number of medical innovations in that period including better sanitation, antisepsis, ether anesthesia, and x-ray, as well as the eventual replacement of heroic medicine with modern, science-based medicine. Dr. Levine is the author of Anatomy of a Hospital and a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Association. He is also an orthopedic surgeon emeritus at the Hospital for Special Surgery. The New York Academy of Medicine and the Museum of the City of New York co-hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, March 17, 2014 at 8:19am (ET)

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