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The Civil War: New York City Historical Sites

New York City
Saturday, February 1, 2014

Author Bill Morgan discusses highlights from his book, “The Civil War Lover’s Guide to New York City,” which considers more than 150 monuments, memorials, forts, graves and other Civil War historical sites in New York City. The Civil War Forum of Metropolitan New York hosted this event. 

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 12:22pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)