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The Civil War: New York City Draft Riots

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 23, 2013

Iver Bernstein discusses the causes and consequences of the New York City Draft Riots of mid-July 1863, that resulted from the federal draft for additional troops to fight in the war. Mister Bernstein spoke at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium.

Updated: Saturday, March 9, 2013 at 1:30pm (ET)

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