All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: Naval Actions & Affairs

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 23, 2013

Historian and author Craig Symonds talks about the various naval aspects of the war – from technological developments, to the battles themselves; from the Union blockade, to the rivers of the Western Theater. Symonds is history professor emeritus at the U.S. Naval Academy, and the author of “The Civil War at Sea.” He presented this talk at the Smithsonian’s Ripley Center, on the National Mall.

Updated: Monday, February 25, 2013 at 9:14am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Naval Technology
Saturday, February 2, 2013     

Historians consider several developments in naval technology over the course of the war. They discuss ironclad gunboats, Confederate efforts to break the Union Blockade, and spar torpedo boats. This event was part of a symposium on Technology and the Civil War hosted by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

The Civil War: 1862 Western Theater River Operations
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

Craig Symonds of the U.S. Naval Academy talks about the war’s Western Theater river operations in 1862. Symonds details the strategies employed by the Union to win several key battles, and credits those victories to the cooperation and combined tactics of General Ulysses S. Grant and Naval Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote. The Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College hosted this event.

The Civil War Along the Atlantic Coast
Saturday, March 24, 2012     

The Mariners’ Museum in Newport News, Virginia hosted a Civil War Navy Conference in early March to mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, when for the first time, ironclads battled during the Civil War. In this session, author and Naval Academy history professor Craig Symonds talks about the War along the Atlantic Coast.

The Civil War: The Ironclad USS Monitor
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

Author and professor David Mindell talks about the technology of the USS Monitor, and the experience of its crew aboard one of the first ironclads. He spoke in early March at the Mariners’ Museum annual Civil War Navy Conference. This year’s conference marked the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads where, for the first time, ironclad warships met in battle.

Identifying Human Remains from the USS Monitor
Saturday, March 24, 2012     

The Mariners’ Museum in Newport News, Virginia hosted a Civil War Navy Conference in early March to mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, when for the first time, ironclads battled during the Civil War. In this session, David Alberg of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary talks about the recovery and identification of human remains from the USS Monitor, the Union ship that faced off with the CSS Virginia near Hampton Roads in 1862. We also hear from genealogist Lisa Stansbury.
 

The Civil War: Northerners' Ideas for Fighting the Merrimac
Saturday, November 24, 2012     

David Gerleman, an assistant editor at the Papers of Abraham Lincoln project, talks about some of the ideas and suggestions offered by Northerners for fighting the Confederate ironclad, the Merrimac. He spoke in early March at the Mariners’ Museum annual Civil War Navy Conference. This year’s conference marked the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads where, for the first time, ironclad warships met in battle.

The Civil War: Gen. Joseph E. Johnston & the Atlanta Campaign
Saturday     

Author and historian Richard McMurry talks about the Civil War career of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston, up to and through his command of the Army of Tennessee and the Atlanta Campaign in the spring and summer of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.
 

The Presidency: Presidential Illness
Sunday, April 6, 2014     

How do presidential illnesses impact U.S. policies and politics? A panel of historians addresses this question by looking at the presidencies of Woodrow Wilson, FDR, Richard Nixon and LBJ. This event is from the symposium “Presidents and Their Crises: When Life Strikes the White House.” It was hosted by Southern Methodist University and the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum.

Amelia Earhart Expedition
Sunday, April 6, 2014     

Celebrity pilot Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan mysteriously disappeared over the Pacific Ocean on their attempted 1937 flight around the world. Did they crash into the sea or become castaways? We hear from the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has investigated the disappearance over the last 25 years. They’ll also discuss their upcoming expedition to Nikumaroro Island in the Republic of Kiribati.

The Civil War: 1864 Union Raid on Richmond
Saturday, April 5, 2014     

The Museum of the Confederacy's Kelly Hancock talks about a Union raid on the Confederate capital in late February and early March of 1864. Among several goals of the operation was the rescue of Union prisoners of war. The efforts proved unsuccessful; and over the course of the raid’s unraveling, one of the commanding officers, Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, was killed. A set of papers found on his body contained orders to burn the city of Richmond and kill Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his cabinet. The papers’ discovery set off a brief firestorm in both the South and the North over the source and authenticity of the orders.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org