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The Civil War: Naval Actions & Affairs

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 23, 2013

Historian and author Craig Symonds talks about the various naval aspects of the war – from technological developments, to the battles themselves; from the Union blockade, to the rivers of the Western Theater. Symonds is history professor emeritus at the U.S. Naval Academy, and the author of “The Civil War at Sea.” He presented this talk at the Smithsonian’s Ripley Center, on the National Mall.

Updated: Monday, February 25, 2013 at 9:14am (ET)

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