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The Civil War: Monitoring & Financing the War

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 7, 2012

Two speakers make presentations at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium. First, author Fergus Bordewich talks about the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, the Congressional panel created to monitor Northern military affairs. Then, economics professor Jenny Bourne talks about how the war was financed.

Updated: Monday, July 9, 2012 at 9:28am (ET)

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