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The Civil War: Iowa State Monument Rededication at Vicksburg

Iowa State Monument at Vicksburg, Mississippi

Iowa State Monument at Vicksburg, Mississippi

Vicksburg, Mississippi
Saturday, June 29, 2013

Vicksburg National Military Park marks the 150th anniversary of the siege of Vicksburg with a ceremony to rededicate the Iowa State Monument, which honors the contributions of Iowa troops to the Union victory. The fall of Vicksburg - the last major Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River – came on July 4, 1863, a day after the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. In this program, Iowa governor Terry Branstad joins former Mississippi governor Haley Barbour to commemorate the Iowa soldiers who fought and died on the Mississippi battlefield. 
 

Updated: Sunday, June 30, 2013 at 11:56pm (ET)

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