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The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville

Union Gen. A.J. Smith

Union Gen. A.J. Smith

Kennesaw, Georgia
Saturday, April 19, 2014

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

Updated: Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:44am (ET)

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