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The Civil War: Coping with Death

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Saturday, January 4, 2014

From Gettysburg National Military Park, a discussion about the effects of over 700,000 Civil War deaths on the country in the mid-nineteenth century. The United States lost about 2% of its population as a result of the war; and here, Admiral Michael Mullen, historian and Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust, and film director Ric Burns talk about the implications of that loss on the country. Mr. Burns directed a PBS American Experience film called “Death and the Civil War” based on Ms. Faust’s book, “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War.” Two clips from the film are shown as part of this presentation. The Gettysburg Foundation, Gettysburg National Military Park, and Gettysburg College co-hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, January 6, 2014 at 10:12am (ET)

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