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The Civil War: Confederate Weapons Manufacturing in Georgia

Kennesaw, Georgia
Saturday, April 26, 2014

Historian Jim Ogden talks about Confederate weapons manufacturing in central Georgia. In the fall of 1864, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman destroyed much of this infrastructure, crippling the Confederate Army’s ability to wage war. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

Updated: Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 11:55am (ET)

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