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The Civil War: Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne

Kennesaw, Georgia
Saturday, April 26, 2014

Historian Craig Symonds discusses the military career of Confederate Major General Patrick Cleburne and the radical proposal he made in 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

Updated: Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 11:56am (ET)

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