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The Civil War: Confederate Gen. Patrick Cleburne

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, February 22, 2014

Museum of the Confederacy guide Michael Thomas talks about the life and military career of Patrick Cleburne. Born and raised in Ireland, Cleburne emigrated to the United States in his early 20s, and settled in Arkansas, where he became a lawyer. He joined a local militia in the lead-up to the Civil War -- and upon Arkansas’ secession from the Union -- Cleburne began his rise through the Confederate ranks, eventually earning the rank of major general. The Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia hosted this event.
 

Updated: Monday, February 24, 2014 at 10:12am (ET)

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