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The Civil War: Cincinnati’s Black Brigade & the Abolition Movement

Washington, DC
Saturday, July 14, 2012

Two speakers make presentations at the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s 2012 Civil War Symposium. First, author Nikki Taylor addresses the issue of citizenship among free African Americans, and the story of Cincinnati’s Black Brigade. Then, history professor Diane Barnes talks about the abolition movement.

Updated: Monday, July 16, 2012 at 9:35am (ET)

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