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The Civil War: Building the U.S. Capitol

U.S. Capitol building during Abraham Lincoln's 1861 inauguration

U.S. Capitol building during Abraham Lincoln's 1861 inauguration

Washington, DC
Saturday, September 7, 2013

Author Guy Gugliotta examines the development and evolution of the U.S. Capitol building, which was started in 1790 with the help of slave labor. The Capitol was rebuilt after it was partially burned by British troops during the War of 1812. In the 1850s, the Capitol went through significant expansion to accommodate the growing number of legislators from newly admitted states. That process continued into the Civil War, with the 1863 completion of the Capitol dome coming to symbolize northern resolve to preserve the Union. The U.S. Capitol Historical Society hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, September 9, 2013 at 9:55am (ET)

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