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The Civil War: Battles of Monocacy & Fort Stevens

150th Anniversary

A plaque at Fort Stevens in Washington, DC

A plaque at Fort Stevens in Washington, DC

Frederick, MD & Washington, DC
Saturday, July 12, 2014

Historian and journalist Marc Leepson took C-SPAN on a tour of several battlefields in Maryland and Washington, D.C., to tell the story of two July 1864 battles that threatened the U.S. Capitol. On July 11 and 12, 1864, President Lincoln observed the fighting at Fort Stevens and was nearly shot by a Confederate sharpshooter. Mr. Leepson is the author of the 2007 book "Desperate Engagement: How a Little-Known Civil War Battle Saved Washington, D.C., and Changed American History."

Updated: Sunday, July 13, 2014 at 10:50am (ET)

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