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The Civil War: Battle of Gettysburg - Day 1

"Scene of Reynolds Fight with Longstreet the First Day," Alfred R. Waud

New York City
Saturday, February 9, 2013

Historians Craig Symonds, James McPherson and Harold Holzer discuss the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. The three-day battle fought in Pennsylvania from July 1st through 3rd, 1863, was the bloodiest of the war, resulting in an estimated 51 thousand total casualties. This is the first in a two-part series on the battle, hosted by the New-York Historical Society.

Updated: Monday, June 17, 2013 at 11:46am (ET)

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