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The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary

Union soldiers at Fort Stevens

Union soldiers at Fort Stevens

Washington, DC
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

Updated: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 at 10:32am (ET)

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In Depth: Joan Biskupic