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The Civil War: Battle of Chickamauga

"Battle of Chickamauga" by Kurz & Allison (1890)

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, October 5, 2013

In this program, a look at the Battle of Chickamauga, fought in northwestern Georgia from September 19-20, 1863. The campaign started with a successful Union advance against Chattanooga, forcing the Confederate Army of Tennessee to retreat into Georgia. But the battle took a turn at Chickamauga Creek, with a timely Confederate charge routing Federal troops and resulting in the Union’s most significant loss in the Western Theater. The battle ended up as the second bloodiest of the war behind only Gettysburg. Will Glasco of the Museum of the Confederacy examines the fighting at Chickamauga Creek and explores the opportunities missed by the Confederates in trying to regain control of Chattanooga. The Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, hosted this event.
 

Updated: Thursday, December 19, 2013 at 11:41am (ET)

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