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The Civil War: Atlanta After the War & Former Slave Abraham Galloway

Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Saturday, January 18, 2014

Two speakers from the 2013 Civil War conference at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. First, author and University of Florida history professor William Link talks about the Civil War’s effects on Atlanta, and how that city dealt with the issues of emancipation, reconstruction and race relations after the war. Then, author and historian David Cecelski talks about the life and work of Abraham Galloway, a former slave who served as a Union spy and African American political leader during the war.

Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014 at 10:46am (ET)

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