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The Civil War: African American Women Refugees

Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Saturday, November 30, 2013

Duke University history professor Thavolia Glymph talks about what happened to former slave women upon escape or emancipation from their former owners over the course of the war. Though their experiences were marked by perpetual transience, Ms. Glymph explains, these women formed new bonds of friendship and support during a turbulent time when many of them were separated from their families and established networks. Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina hosted this event.
 

Updated: Monday, December 2, 2013 at 10:48am (ET)

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