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The Civil War: African American Espionage

Washington, DC
Saturday, March 8, 2014

Hari Jones of the African American Civil War Memorial and Museum delivers a two-part talk about African American intelligence and espionage efforts on behalf of the Union leading up to and through the war. In part one, he details the pre-existing networks of people of African descent in the United States, and how those “knowledge circles,” as he calls them, were the foundations for the “Loyal League,” a secret national organization of slaves, servants, and freedmen who contributed to the Union cause, and viewed the Civil War as the ultimate means of ending slavery. In part two, he details the activities and movements of specific African Americans on both sides of the lines during the war. The Historical Society of Washington, DC and the International Spy Museum co-hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, March 10, 2014 at 11:43am (ET)

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