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The Civil War: 1864 Union Raid on Richmond

Col. Ulric Dahlgren

Col. Ulric Dahlgren

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, April 5, 2014

The Museum of the Confederacy's Kelly Hancock talks about a Union raid on the Confederate capital in late February and early March of 1864. Among several goals of the operation was the rescue of Union prisoners of war. The efforts proved unsuccessful; and over the course of the raid’s unraveling, one of the commanding officers, Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, was killed. A set of papers found on his body contained orders to burn the city of Richmond and kill Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his cabinet. The papers’ discovery set off a brief firestorm in both the South and the North over the source and authenticity of the orders.

Updated: Sunday, April 6, 2014 at 11:30am (ET)

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