All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

The Civil War: 1864 Attack on Atlanta

Atlanta, GA
Saturday, September 10, 2011

In 1864, the city of Atlanta fell after a four-month siege by Union troops.  Union General William Sherman would later issue an order to burn Atlanta to the ground, sparing only its churches and hospitals.
 
Historian Bob Davis talks about the attack and how the city was reborn at the Atlanta Cyclorama Museum.

Updated: Monday, September 12, 2011 at 1:18pm (ET)

Related Events

Civil War Institute: The Confederate High Command
Saturday, July 23, 2011     

The battle of Bull Run took place on July 21, 1861 and was one of the main topics of this year’s annual summer conference hosted by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College.

The Civil War: Battle of Trevilian Station
Saturday     

Author and historian Eric Wittenberg discusses the Battle of Trevilian Station, which took place in Virginia June 11-12, 1864. He describes the decisions Union Gen. Philip Sheridan and his Confederate counterpart Wade Hampton made and how those choices led to the decisive Confederate victory. This talk was part of symposium hosted by the “Emerging Civil War” blog. 

The Civil War: Union Gen. James B. McPherson
Saturday, September 6, 2014     

Author and Texas Christian University professor Steven Woodworth discusses the military career of Union Gen. James B. McPherson, who served in and later commanded the Union Army of the Tennessee. Professor Woodworth also describes McPherson’s relationship with Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and his role in Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign. 

The Civil War: 1864 Atlanta Campaign
Saturday, August 30, 2014     

University of West Georgia professor Keith Bohannon discusses General William Tecumseh Sherman’s 1864 Atlanta campaign. In May 1864, General Sherman marched south from Chattanooga into Georgia with the goal of capturing Atlanta. After a series of battles throughout the summer and a siege of the city, Atlanta fell to the Union on September 2, 1864, setting up Sherman’s March to the Sea later in the year.

The Civil War: The Life of Winnie Davis
Saturday, August 23, 2014     

Author Heath Hardage Lee discusses the life of Winnie Davis, daughter of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Lee describes Winnie’s life growing up in the Confederate White House in Richmond, her post-war rise to popularity in both the North and the South, and her writing career. The Museum of the Confederacy hosted this event. 

Historical Accuracy of the Movie “Lincoln”
Friday, August 22, 2014     

Dickinson College professor Matthew Pinsker dissects Stephen Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln,” analyzing what is fact and what is Hollywood fiction. Professor Pinsker goes into detail about the historical significance of the events the movie portrays, but also highlights areas where Mr. Spielberg exercised his artistic freedom. This talk is a portion of the 2014 Civil War Symposium hosted by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. 

The Civil War: Remembering the Battle of the Crater
Wednesday, August 20, 2014     

Author Kevin Levin discusses the role of the U.S. Colored Troops in the Battle of the Crater, and the way their contributions were remembered in the years following the Civil War. The Battle of the Crater took place July 30, 1864, as part of the Union Army’s siege of Petersburg.

The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary
Tuesday, August 19, 2014     

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

The Civil War: Slavery & Cinema
Saturday, August 16, 2014     

A panel of history professors traces the evolution of slavery as depicted in film since the 1930s. Drawing examples from films like “Mandingo,” “Amistad” and “12 Years a Slave,” panelists discuss how filmmakers have framed the idea of slavery. They also describe changes in race relations and gender portrayals in films and how slave characters have shifted from the background into leading roles. 

The Civil War: Battle of the Crater 150th Anniversary
Saturday, August 9, 2014     

A National Park Service event at Petersburg National Battlefield commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of the Crater and honoring the U.S. Colored Troops' role in the fighting. The Battle of the Crater took place on July 30, 1864, as part of the Siege of Petersburg. The ceremony includes the unveiling of a stamp by the U.S. Postal Service and remarks by historian James Blankenship, who details the major events of the battle. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

American History TV