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The Civil War: 1864 Atlanta Campaign

William Tecumseh Sherman

William Tecumseh Sherman

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Friday, July 4, 2014

University of West Georgia professor Keith Bohannon discusses General William Tecumseh Sherman’s 1864 Atlanta campaign. In May 1864, General Sherman marched south from Chattanooga into Georgia with the goal of capturing Atlanta. After a series of battles throughout the summer and a siege of the city, Atlanta fell to the Union on September 2, 1864, setting up Sherman’s March to the Sea later in the year.

Updated: Monday, July 7, 2014 at 10:04am (ET)

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