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The CIA and the Cuban Missile Crisis - 1992 Archival Film from the CIA

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 22, 2011

History Professor James Hershberg lectures on the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962.

Updated: Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 11:36am (ET)

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