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The Bill of Rights & The First Congress

Federal Hall in New York City

Federal Hall in New York City

Simi Valley, California
Saturday, October 5, 2013

Public Policy Professor Gordon Lloyd speaks at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on the Bill of Rights. He discusses how the first Congress dealt with the Bill of Rights, and the views of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson on the document.

Updated: Tuesday, October 8, 2013 at 1:51pm (ET)

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