All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Technology in Gilded Age Mansions

Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island

Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 12, 2014

Historian Patrick Sheary discusses technology in Gilded Age mansions. Wealthy families sought to incorporate the latest innovations into their European revival homes. The period not only witnessed innovations in building materials and plumbing but also saw the advent of electricity, air conditioning, phones, and elevators.

Updated: Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 10:45am (ET)

Related Events

Wealth in the Gilded Age
Saturday, December 8, 2012     

Stanford University’s Center for Ethics in Society hosts a discussion on the disparity of wealth during the Gilded Age. Stanford History Professor Richard White argues that the majority of Americans in this period viewed excessive wealth as an embarrassment. Gavin Jones, chair of Stanford's English department, analyzes literature from the Gilded Age that critiques the excesses of society.

New York City During the Gilded Age
Wednesday, December 25, 2013     

Architectural historian Barry Lewis explores New York City during the Gilded Age. Mr. Lewis argues that there were two eras of the Gilded Age, the first beginning after the Civil War, where new money brought large homes to the city. The second started in the early 20th century and lasted until the First World War. Like the first period, it was also defined by the rich showing off their wealth, but in a simpler way. The New-York Historical Society hosted this illustrated talk.

American Artifacts: Gilded Age New York
Sunday, March 23, 2014     

A visit to the Museum of the City of New York to learn how the "one percent" lived in the 19th century. The exhibit "Gilded New York" includes paintings, jewelry, gowns, and decorative arts used by the wealthiest New Yorkers in a time of unabashed excess.  Our tour guides are museum curators Jeannine Falino and Phyllis Magidson.

Lectures in History: Muckraker Jacob Riis & Gilded Age New York City
Saturday, March 29, 2014     

Mount Holyoke College history professor Daniel Czitrom teaches a class on Jacob Riis, who was one of the pioneers of muckraking journalism. His photographs of life in New York City’s tenements during the Gilded Age highlighted the difficult living conditions there and his work was used to lobby for reform. An immigrant himself, Riis’ photography and book, “How the Other Half Lives,” gave insight into the lives of immigrants, many of whom were racial and religious minorities. 

Lectures in History: 1960s & 1970s Popular Music and Feminism
Thursday     

Indiana University professor Michael McGerr discusses feminism and its impact on popular music in the 1960s and ‘70s. The class is part of a course called “Rock, Hip Hop and Revolution: Popular Music in the Making of Modern America, 1940 to the Present.”

Lectures in History: Civil Rights & the “War on Poverty”
Monday     

Oregon State University professor Marisa Chappell discusses the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the anti-poverty and entitlement programs that were part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” She also details the societal attitudes toward impoverished minorities at the time, focusing on the challenges faced by single mothers. 

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Monday     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Lectures in History: Comparing the Reconstruction & Civil Rights Eras
Monday     

College of William & Mary professor Melvin Ely and his students compare the Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras, exploring many of the similarities and differences between the post-Civil War South and what Professor Ely calls "The Second Reconstruction" of the 1960s. This class is part of a course called “African American History from Emancipation to the Present.”

The Presidency: How Presidents Make Decisions
Sunday     

How do presidents make important decisions – whether it’s firing cabinet officials or going to war? Hear about their decision-making process from former chiefs of staff and advisers to presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. The panelists also detailed their own relationships with the presidents they served, and discussed their time in the White House. The Panetta Institute for Public Policy hosted this event. Former Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, moderated the discussion. 

Roosevelt’s Role in Preparing for D-Day
Sunday     

Author Nigel Hamilton discusses President Roosevelt’s role in preparing the allied forces for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He argues that Roosevelt, by pushing for earlier military operations such as the North African campaign, ensured that the allied forces would be combat-hardened and prepared for D-Day. Hamilton is the author of a new book, "The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942." The Dwight D. Eisenhower Library and Museum hosted this event. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

Photo Gallery

Washington Journal (late 2012)