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Technology in Gilded Age Mansions

Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island

Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 12, 2014

Historian Patrick Sheary discusses technology in Gilded Age mansions. Wealthy families sought to incorporate the latest innovations into their European revival homes. The period not only witnessed innovations in building materials and plumbing but also saw the advent of electricity, air conditioning, phones, and elevators.

Updated: Sunday, April 13, 2014 at 10:45am (ET)

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