All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Teaching About Slavery

Descendants of Sally Hemings & Thomas Jefferson at Monticello, 1999

Descendants of Sally Hemings & Thomas Jefferson at Monticello, 1999

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, May 18, 2013

Harvard Law School history professor Annette Gordon-Reed is the author of two books exploring the story of Sally Hemings and her family’s ties to Thomas Jefferson. Her 2009 book, “The Hemingses of Monticello,” won a Pulitzer Prize. At the National Council for History Education National Conference in Richmond, Virginia, professor Gordon-Reed discusses teaching about slavery, as well as the research that led to her books.

Updated: Monday, July 22, 2013 at 12:53pm (ET)

Related Events

Slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello
Saturday, July 21, 2012     

Lucia Stanton, senior historian at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, has been studying and writing about Thomas Jefferson and his enslaved community for more than 30 years. In this program, she argues that the President sometimes treated his slaves as human beings and at other times as property. Using thousands of records kept by the third president, Stanton attempts to imagine what life was like from the point of view of the slaves. She is joined by historian Dianne Swann-Wright to discuss their ongoing oral history project that has collected the stories of over 170 descendants of Monticello’s slaves.

The Presidency: Thomas Jefferson and Alternatives to Slavery
Sunday, July 17, 2011     

Thomas Jefferson purchased a 1,334 acre tract in Virginia as a testing ground for various agricultural methods and labor systems – experiments that presented alternatives to slavery. In this discussion, a panel reflects on Jefferson’s motivations, his relationship with his confidante William Short, and their exchange of ideas on how to best manage this land known first as “Indian Camp” and then later named Morven.

Life Portraits: Thomas Jefferson
Sunday, March 10, 2013     

In this third program in our 1999 "American Presidents: Life Portraits" series we focused on Thomas Jefferson's life and career. Guests including authors Andrew Burstein and Annette Gordon-Reed as well as Monticello Director Dan Jordan joined us from Jefferson's home in Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Thomas Jefferson's Idea of America
Saturday, March 31, 2012     

Although Thomas Jefferson was in France as the Constitution was being debated and signed, he had his own ideas of how he hoped the new nation would look. University of Virginia History Professor Peter Onuf examines Thomas Jefferson's idea of America and how his relationship with James Madison - whose ideas differed from his own - affected his opinion.

Professor Woody Holton on Thomas Jefferson the Revolutionary
Sunday, November 21, 2010     

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation recently hosted Professor Woody Holton, who discussed Jefferson’s motivations for writing the Declaration of Independence and the unlikely groups that influenced him.

American Artifacts: Thomas Jefferson’s Bible
Sunday, May 22, 2011     

In his later years, Thomas Jefferson compiled his own version of the Bible’s four Gospels, extracting what he believed to be key moral teachings from six Bibles in four languages. He pasted the passages together, and had them bound in an 86-page volume in 1820. American History TV visited the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History to learn about a project to preserve and exhibit the "Jefferson Bible."

Thomas Jefferson on Democracy
Saturday, May 14, 2011     

The “Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series” is a project to compile Thomas Jefferson’s letters and papers for the period of 1809 through 1826. The project is being undertaken by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation.

White House Correspondents' Association
Sunday     

We hear from journalists and historians about the evolution of the White House Correspondents’ Association, which is marking its centennial. The organization was founded in 1914 after President Woodrow Wilson threatened to limit the access of White House reporters. The panel also discusses how social media has affected coverage of the president.

Recorded History of the U.S. Congress
Sunday     

2014 marks the 225th anniversary of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. As part of the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government, past and present House and Senate historians came together to discuss the state of congressional history. They explored current projects to retrieve old records from individual members of Congress as well as the many differences between the first Congress and Congress today. 

American Artifacts: Making & Breaking Secret Codes
Sunday     

American History TV visits the National Cryptologic Museum - located on the campus of the National Security Agency, just north of Washington, DC - to learn about the making and breaking of secret codes, and their role in U.S. history. This two-part program includes a look at the breaking of the German “Enigma” code and the Japanese diplomatic and naval codes in World War II. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org