All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Surviving Vietnam as a POW

"Hanoi Hilton" Prison Camp

Point Lookout, Missouri
Sunday, February 2, 2014

In 1967, air force pilot Lee Ellis was shot down as he flew over enemy territory in Vietnam. He was held as a prisoner of war for five years in Hanoi, returning to the United States in 1973. He recently spoke at the College of the Ozarks about his experiences as a POW, how he survived, and his book “Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.”

Updated: Monday, February 3, 2014 at 11:19am (ET)

Related Events

Vietnam Prisoners of War Remember
Friday, May 31, 2013     

As part of a three day commemoration marking the return of American POWs from Vietnam, we hear directly from former prisoners of war who recall their imprisonment and ultimate release. And they remember the 1973 White House homecoming celebration hosted by President Richard Nixon on May 24, 1973. Fox News commentator and Republican Pollster Frank Luntz moderated the discussion. The Richard Nixon Foundation hosted this event.
 

President Nixon’s Toast at the White House Dinner for Vietnam POWs
Friday, May 31, 2013     

May 24, 1973 - President Nixon hosted a dinner on the South Lawn of the White House to welcome home Vietnam POWs. This is President Nixon’s toast at the dinner.

Vietnam POW Homecoming: 40th Anniversary Dinner
Friday, May 31, 2013     

This was a reunion of Vietnam POWs on the 40th anniversary of the White House homecoming dinner President Nixon hosted on May 24, 1973. President Nixon’s daughter, Tricia Nixon Cox, former presidential candidate Ross Perot and Congressman Ed Royce (R-CA) addressed the gathering.  The evening also included a special performance by the POW Chorus, which sang at the original dinner.  The Richard Nixon Foundation hosted this event.

Vietnam POW Homecoming: 40th Anniversary
Friday, May 31, 2013     

The Richard Nixon Foundation commemorated the 40th anniversary of a White House dinner hosted by President Nixon to welcome home American POWs from Vietnam. This opening event of the three day observance at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum includes a wreath laying in honor of President Nixon and welcoming remarks from retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Richard Newton.

President Nixon's Address on the End of the Vietnam War
Saturday, March 23, 2013     

In January 1973, representatives from the U.S., South and North Vietnam signed the Paris Peace Accords. While fighting continued until the fall of Saigon in 1975, the Accords marked the end of direct U.S. involvement in Vietnam. In the 60 days following the signing of the agreement, the U.S. withdrew its remaining combat troops.  40 years ago, on March 29th, 1973 President Nixon spoke to the nation about the end of the Vietnam War.  This is a portion of that televised address from the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Why the U.S. Lost the Vietnam War
Saturday, March 23, 2013     

Authors and veterans of the wars in Iraq and Vietnam debate the reasons why the U.S. lost the Vietnam War. They focus especially on the military leadership and the decisions they made. This event was co-hosted by the Foreign Policy Research Institute and the Reserve Officers Association.

1973 Operation Homecoming
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

40 years ago -- February 12, 1973 -- was the start of "Operation Homecoming," the release of hundred of Americans held as Vietnam POW's. This is a 1992 interview with one of those POWs, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), who describes his experiences as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. This program begins with a tour of a prison where he was held.

Lectures in History: Jews in the Progressive Era
Saturday     

Georgetown University Professor Jonathan Ray looks at the lives of American Jews in the Progressive Era, including questions about Jewish assimilation into the wider American culture. He discusses Jewish support of socialism and organized labor, as well as issues of discrimination against Jews in the workplace and in society. He also examines ethnic, racial and religious differences within the Jewish community itself. 

The Search for Missing World War II Servicemen
Saturday     

Author and New York Times Magazine contributing writer, Wil Hylton talks about his book, “Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II." According to Mr. Hylton, the United States is committed to bringing all service members home – even though there are some 83,000 missing. 73,000 of the missing were World War II servicemen. In this talk, Mr. Hylton tells the story of the search for one American bomber plane that disappeared over the tiny Pacific island of Palau in 1944 and he also describes the work being done to find all the missing of World War II. This event was hosted by the New York Public Library. 

The Civil War: Gen. A.J. Smith’s Guerrillas & the Battle of Nashville
Saturday     

Texas Christian University history professor Steven Woodworth talks about Union General A.J. Smith’s guerrillas—a contingent of the Army of the Tennessee—and their involvement and decisive action in the Battle of Nashville in December of 1864. This talk was part of a symposium on 1864 and the Western Theater, held by the Civil War Center at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia.

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org