All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Surviving Vietnam as a POW

"Hanoi Hilton" Prison Camp

Point Lookout, Missouri
Sunday, February 2, 2014

In 1967, air force pilot Lee Ellis was shot down as he flew over enemy territory in Vietnam. He was held as a prisoner of war for five years in Hanoi, returning to the United States in 1973. He recently spoke at the College of the Ozarks about his experiences as a POW, how he survived, and his book “Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.”

Updated: Monday, February 3, 2014 at 11:19am (ET)

Related Events

Vietnam Prisoners of War Remember
Friday, May 31, 2013     

As part of a three day commemoration marking the return of American POWs from Vietnam, we hear directly from former prisoners of war who recall their imprisonment and ultimate release. And they remember the 1973 White House homecoming celebration hosted by President Richard Nixon on May 24, 1973. Fox News commentator and Republican Pollster Frank Luntz moderated the discussion. The Richard Nixon Foundation hosted this event.
 

President Nixon’s Toast at the White House Dinner for Vietnam POWs
Friday, May 31, 2013     

May 24, 1973 - President Nixon hosted a dinner on the South Lawn of the White House to welcome home Vietnam POWs. This is President Nixon’s toast at the dinner.

Vietnam POW Homecoming: 40th Anniversary Dinner
Friday, May 31, 2013     

This was a reunion of Vietnam POWs on the 40th anniversary of the White House homecoming dinner President Nixon hosted on May 24, 1973. President Nixon’s daughter, Tricia Nixon Cox, former presidential candidate Ross Perot and Congressman Ed Royce (R-CA) addressed the gathering.  The evening also included a special performance by the POW Chorus, which sang at the original dinner.  The Richard Nixon Foundation hosted this event.

Vietnam POW Homecoming: 40th Anniversary
Friday, May 31, 2013     

The Richard Nixon Foundation commemorated the 40th anniversary of a White House dinner hosted by President Nixon to welcome home American POWs from Vietnam. This opening event of the three day observance at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum includes a wreath laying in honor of President Nixon and welcoming remarks from retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Richard Newton.

President Nixon's Address on the End of the Vietnam War
Saturday, March 23, 2013     

In January 1973, representatives from the U.S., South and North Vietnam signed the Paris Peace Accords. While fighting continued until the fall of Saigon in 1975, the Accords marked the end of direct U.S. involvement in Vietnam. In the 60 days following the signing of the agreement, the U.S. withdrew its remaining combat troops.  40 years ago, on March 29th, 1973 President Nixon spoke to the nation about the end of the Vietnam War.  This is a portion of that televised address from the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Why the U.S. Lost the Vietnam War
Saturday, March 23, 2013     

Authors and veterans of the wars in Iraq and Vietnam debate the reasons why the U.S. lost the Vietnam War. They focus especially on the military leadership and the decisions they made. This event was co-hosted by the Foreign Policy Research Institute and the Reserve Officers Association.

1973 Operation Homecoming
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

40 years ago -- February 12, 1973 -- was the start of "Operation Homecoming," the release of hundred of Americans held as Vietnam POW's. This is a 1992 interview with one of those POWs, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), who describes his experiences as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. This program begins with a tour of a prison where he was held.

Presidential Vacations
Monday     

American History TV interviewed Lawrence Knutson, author of “Away from the White House: Presidential Escapes, Retreats, and Vacations” about the history and politics of presidential getaways. We feature archival footage released by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library of President Kennedy summering in Cape Cod. 

Causes of the Vietnam War
Monday     

A panel of Vietnam veterans and scholars reflect on the events leading up to the Vietnam War and whether it was a necessary conflict for America. The speakers also discuss what it was like being in the war, both from the American and Vietnamese points of view. The Vietnam Veterans for Factual History organized this event.

Senator Sam Ervin and Watergate
Sunday     

We hear about Senator Sam Ervin’s time as chair of the Senate Watergate Committee from his former aide Rufus Edmisten and his grandson, Judge Sam Ervin IV. They recall Ervin’s character and how the self-proclaimed country lawyer relied on his knowledge of the law and personal convictions to guide the Senate Watergate Committee.  

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Radio