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State Department Hosts Women of Courage Awards

Washington, DC
Friday, March 8, 2013

Secretary of State John Kerry and First Lady Michelle Obama handed out Women of Courage Awards. The annual award recognizes women from around the world who have shown courage and leadership in advocating for women's rights.

This year, the awards went to Malalai Bahaduri, First Sergeant, Afghan National Interdiction Unit (Afghanistan); Julieta Castellanos, Rector, National Autonomous University of Honduras (Honduras); Dr. Josephine Obiajulu Odumakin, President, Campaign for Democracy (Nigeria); Elena Milashina, journalist, human rights activist (Russia); and Fartuun Adan, Executive Director, Elman Peace and Human Rights Centre (Somalia).

Tsering Woeser (Wei Se), Tibetan author, poet, blogger (China); Razan Zeitunah, human rights lawyer and Founder, Local Coordination Committees (Syria); and Ta Phong Tan, blogger (Vietnam) received awards in absentia. Nirbhaya “Fearless,” champion for justice (India) received a posthumous award.

Updated: Friday, March 8, 2013 at 3:44pm (ET)

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