All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Slavery and the Myth of Race

Slave Auction in Charleston, South Carolina

Slave Auction in Charleston, South Carolina

Washington, DC
Sunday, February 9, 2014

Historian and author Jacqueline Jones discusses her latest book, “A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America” at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Professor Jones argues that “race” does not exist and was created as a justification and rationalization for slavery.    

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 10:14am (ET)

Related Events

Ending Slavery in America
Monday, October 14, 2013     

Historian and professor David Blight discusses the events leading up to the emancipation of slaves in America. He examines the political maneuvering that occurred during the Civil War, and the complex motivations behind Abraham Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. He also recounts the reactions to the Proclamation, from northern abolitionists, to southern slaveholders, to the slaves themselves. The German Historical Institute in Washington, DC hosted this event as part of a lecture series on how societies around the world abolished slavery.

Slavery: From Scholarship to Public Interpretation
Saturday, May 25, 2013     

How is slavery interpreted at historic sites – and how has that interpretation evolved over the last quarter century? Those were among the questions addressed at a conference convened at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello to consider the history of slavery scholarship and how it makes its way to the American public.

Teaching About Slavery
Saturday, May 18, 2013     

Harvard Law School history professor Annette Gordon-Reed is the author of two books exploring the story of Sally Hemings and her family’s ties to Thomas Jefferson. Her 2009 book, “The Hemingses of Monticello,” won a Pulitzer Prize. At the National Council for History Education National Conference in Richmond, Virginia, professor Gordon-Reed discusses teaching about slavery, as well as the research that led to her books.

Interpreting Slavery at Historic Sites
Sunday, April 21, 2013     

A panel discusses how slavery is represented and reconstructed at places like Thomas Jefferson's Monticello and James Monroe’s home, Ash Lawn-Highland. They also delve into the problems of excavation, restoration, and historic interpretation at these sites. This event was hosted by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello.

Slavery and Emancipation in Photographs
Saturday, February 16, 2013     

The National Archives hosted this look at how newly freed slaves were portrayed in photographs after the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of the Civil War. We also see photographs from before the war that help distinguish how African Americans were later depicted.

History of Opposition to Slavery & Human Trafficking
Saturday, January 19, 2013     

A panel of history professors examines 18th and 19th century slavery abolition movements and early legislative efforts opposing prostitution & sex trafficking or so-called “white slavery.” The panel considers how these historic examples might be applied to the problem of modern day human trafficking & forced labor. This event was held at Yale University and hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition and Resistance.

The Presidency: First Ladies & Fashion
Sunday     

The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library hosts author Annette Dunlap as she explores the evolution of first ladies’ fashion. She chronicles the impact fashion had on the public image of the women living in the White House and what their wardrobe choices reveal about the times in which they lived.  

"The Classical Liberal Constitution"
Sunday     

This is a conversation about the new book, “The Classical Liberal Constitution: The Uncertain Quest for Limited Government.” Featured are the book's author, New York University Law School professor Richard Epstein, and University of Pennsylvania Law School professor, Theodore Ruger. They debate the ideas put forth in Epstein's book about the powers of the federal government outlined in the Constitution. The National Constitution Center hosted this event and its president, Jeffrey Rosen, moderated the discussion.  

American Artifacts: JFK Assassination Records
Sunday     

A visit to National Archives in College Park, Maryland to learn about the vast collection of artifacts related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  Martha Wagner Murphy, Head of the Special Access and Freedom of Information Act staff appears to discuss how records are preserved, including the so-called "magic bullet," Oswald's rifle, and the Zapruder film.

Missouri’s German-American Community During WWI
Sunday     

Author and history professor Petra DeWitt talks about the Missouri home front during World War I. German-Americans made up one of the largest immigrant groups in the state at the time and were often scrutinized merely for being German. Professor DeWitt argues that this was not just because of federal doctrines like the Espionage Act and Sedition Act, but that local authorities and individuals were harsher judges of patriotism. The Kansas City Public Library hosted this event.

Share This Event Via Social Media
Book TV (late 2012)