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Slavery and the Myth of Race

Slave Auction in Charleston, South Carolina

Slave Auction in Charleston, South Carolina

Washington, DC
Sunday, February 9, 2014

Historian and author Jacqueline Jones discusses her latest book, “A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama’s America” at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Professor Jones argues that “race” does not exist and was created as a justification and rationalization for slavery.    

Updated: Monday, February 10, 2014 at 10:14am (ET)

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