All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Serving in World War II

Navajo Code Talkers, 1944

Navajo Code Talkers, 1944

Washington, DC
Saturday, January 4, 2014

Veterans of World War II talk about their wartime experiences. One served as a fighter pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps and flew the last mission of the war on August 14, 1945. The other is the last surviving veteran of the original Navajo Code Talkers – a group of Navajo marines who created a secret military language used successfully during the war in the pacific and finally declassified in 1968. This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November 2013. 

Updated: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at 5:40pm (ET)

Related Events

World War II Veterans on the War in Europe
Saturday, November 10, 2012     

Two World War II veterans and a former Army nurse who helped liberate German concentration camps describe the chaos and destruction they witnessed in Europe during the war. This event is from the American Veterans Center’s 15th Annnual Conference in Washington, DC.

World War II Veterans Commemorate Victory Over Japan Day
Saturday, November 10, 2012     

The Daughters of World War II and the Frontiers of Flight Museum commemorate Victory Over Japan Day. Fiske Hanley, a former B-29 crew member and Japanese POW, talks about his wartime experiences along with Bill Nagase, a former Japanese kamikaze pilot. The two men met as co-workers in the 1970s, and became friends.

Reflections of World War II Veterans
Sunday, December 29, 2013     

Two World War II veterans reflect on their experiences in battle. The first was a gunnery officer on the USS Barb — a submarine responsible for sinking many enemy ships in the Pacific. We also hear from an Army soldier of the 2nd Ranger Battalion whose mission on D-Day was to destroy enemy munitions in France. This event was part of the American Veterans Center Annual Conference held in November 2013. 

WWII Veterans: Oral Histories
Friday, June 4, 2004     

It's the first of two weeks of programs featuring oral history recordings from D-Day veterans, being heard for the first time ever on radio or television. This week, hear the stories of Lt. Roger Airgood, a U.S. Army Air Corps pilot who dropped some of the Army paratroopers on the beach at Normandy 60 years ago; also U.S. Army Tech. Sgt. Malvin Pike, who was among the first wave of soldiers to land on the beach from watercraft. Recordings courtesy of the Peter S. Kalikow World War II Oral History Archive at the Eisenhower Center for American Studies, University of New Orleans, Metropolitan College and housed at the National D-Day Museum in New Orleans.

Women Airforce Service Pilots of WWII
Sunday, August 29, 2010     

Over one-thousand women volunteered to become Women Air Force Service Pilots during World War II. Known as "WASPS," the female pilots were not granted military status until the 1970's. Recently they were honored with the Congressional Gold Medal on Capitol Hill.

Pacific Theater of World War II
Saturday, January 5, 2013     

World War II veterans talk about their experiences fighting in the Pacific Theater. R.V. Burgin reflects on his time in the Marine Corps, described in his book, "Islands of the Damned." Roy Matsomoto discusses his Army service behind Japanese enemy lines in Burma. The moderator is Patrick O’Donnell, author of “Into the Rising Sun: World War II’s Pacific Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat.” 

An Oral History: Hershel Williams (WWII Veteran)
Saturday, August 28, 2010     

"Woody" Williams is the last surviving Iwo Jima Medal Of Honor recipient. He recalls the battle in this oral history for the National World War II Museum.

Recovering the Remains of a Lost WWII Pilot
Sunday, December 29, 2013     

Author and journalist Bryan Bender details his time following a group of military anthropologists as they search the jungles of New Guinea for the remains of a downed World War II pilot. Mr. Bender compares the war experiences of the lost pilot to those of the leader of the expedition, an Iraq war veteran, and suggests that the differences and similarities between the experiences reflect how war has changed since World War II.

White House Correspondents' Association
Sunday     

We hear from journalists and historians about the evolution of the White House Correspondents’ Association, which is marking its centennial. The organization was founded in 1914 after President Woodrow Wilson threatened to limit the access of White House reporters. The panel also discusses how social media has affected coverage of the president.

Recorded History of the U.S. Congress
Sunday     

2014 marks the 225th anniversary of the first meeting of the U.S. Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. As part of the annual meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government, past and present House and Senate historians came together to discuss the state of congressional history. They explored current projects to retrieve old records from individual members of Congress as well as the many differences between the first Congress and Congress today. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Video Playlist

Related Resources

C-SPAN on Facebook (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org