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Senator Sam Ervin and Watergate

Senator Sam Ervin

Senator Sam Ervin

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 31, 2014

We hear about Senator Sam Ervin’s time as chair of the Senate Watergate Committee from his former aide Rufus Edmisten and his grandson, Judge Sam Ervin IV. They recall Ervin’s character and how the self-proclaimed country lawyer relied on his knowledge of the law and personal convictions to guide the Senate Watergate Committee.  

Updated: Monday, September 1, 2014 at 10:05am (ET)

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