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Senate Banking Cmte. Hearing on Wall Street Reform Implementation

Washington, DC
Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Senate Banking Committee hears an update from regulators on the implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Committee Chairman Tim Johnson (D-SD) conducts a hearing titled “Wall Street Reform: Oversight of Financial Stability and Consumer and Investor Protections." The hearing focuses on the financial stability and protections for consumers and investors.

As Reuters reports, "Financial regulatory agencies have been writing a heap of new rules called for by the Dodd-Frank law, which Congress passed in response to the 2007-2009 U.S. financial crisis."

Today's hearing provides seven officials the opportunity to detail the challenges they have encountered while working with Wall Street to implement the law.

Among the witnesses testifying at Thursday's hearing are: Mary Miller, undersecretary of the Treasury for domestic finance; Federal Reserve Gov. Dan Tarullo; FDIC Chair Martin Gruenberg; SEC Chair Elisse Walter; CFTC Chair Gary Gensler; and Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Bureau.

Updated: Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 1:30pm (ET)

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