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Sen. Mitch McConnell on Henry Clay

Depiction of Henry Clay as a Hunter, 1844

Depiction of Henry Clay as a Hunter, 1844

Lexington, KY
Saturday, November 17, 2012

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) speaks about the legacy of Henry Clay. Known as the "Great Compromiser," Clay was a member of both the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate for over four decades. The University of Kentucky hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, November 19, 2012 at 4:45pm (ET)

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