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Secret Work of Women in "Atomic City"

Women Leaving Manhattan Project's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, 1945

Women Leaving Manhattan Project's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, 1945

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 6, 2013

Author Denise Kiernan looks at the lives and the mysterious work of the women in one of three Manhattan Project secret cities – the town of Oak Ridge, Tennessee - that helped enrich uranium for the first atomic bomb during World War II. She explains that the city was quickly built from scratch in 1942 and drew many young women from around the country with the promise of well-paying jobs. Because the project was top-secret, no one knew what their work would produce until the first atomic bomb hit Hiroshima and ended the war. This event took place at the National Archives.

Updated: Saturday, April 6, 2013 at 12:12pm (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)