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Role of Combat Chaplains in World War II

Father (Major) Edward J. Waters, 1944

Father (Major) Edward J. Waters, 1944

New Orleans
Saturday, July 19, 2014

Author and professor Lyle Dorsett talks about the role of military chaplains during World War II. Roughly 12,000 chaplains traveled with combatants into battle and served as friends, advisers, and spiritual leaders. Professor Dorsett explores the difficulties the chaplains faced and shares stories from many of their autobiographies. This event was part of the National WWII Museum’s commemoration of the 70th anniversary of D-Day. 

Updated: Sunday, July 20, 2014 at 10:19am (ET)

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