All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Robert Kennedy & the Struggle for Racial Justice

Cambridge, Massachusetts
Sunday, June 2, 2013

Author Patricia Sullivan talks about Robert Kennedy and the civil rights movement of the 1960s. She chronicles his early encounters with racism and the evolution of his politics and principles.  Robert Kennedy served as U.S. Attorney General during his brother’s administration, and in the U.S. Senate from 1965 to 1968, when he was assassinated while campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination. This event took place at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.

Updated: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:58am (ET)

Related Events

Stokely Carmichael & the Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, March 30, 2013     

Tufts University history professor, Peniel Joseph, talks about his working biography of Stokely Carmichael at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. Mr. Joseph argues that Carmichael played an important role in the 1960s Civil Rights movement, working as a bridge between many factions advocating for equal rights for African Americans.

JFK on Civil Rights
Sunday, May 13, 2012     

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library convened a conference on the presidency and civil rights. In this discussion, panelists consider President Kennedy's legacy and the evolution of his thinking and actions on civil rights.

Detroit's Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, September 1, 2012     

The Detroit Historical Society hosts this discussion on Detroit’s civil rights movement. Panelists focus on the years following the Civil War through the Great Migration, a period when millions of blacks moved from the South to areas north and west. 

Lectures in History: The Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, June 2, 2012     

University of Washington American History Professor Quintard Taylor looks at the Civil Rights Movement from the 1940s through the 1960s.  Professor Taylor focuses on the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Brown v. Board of Education and the 1957 integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Oral Histories: Rev. Joseph Lowery
Saturday, April 6, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of several key events from the civil rights movement, including the Birmingham Campaign and the March on Washington. Lonnie Bunch, the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, is joined by curator Elaine Nichols to introduce the museum’s Civil Rights Oral History Project, which was conducted in conjunction with the Library of Congress and the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. We’ll then see an oral history interview from that collection with Rev. Joseph Lowery who, along with Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and others, founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Civil Rights & the “Little Rock Nine”
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

Ernest Green, one of the “Little Rock Nine” -- the first nine African American students to attend Little Rock Central High School in 1957 -- talks about his experience in a speech at the annual conference of the National Consortium on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Courts. The school was the site of forced desegregation in the wake of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. 

Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign: First-Person Accounts
Thursday, May 2, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign in Alabama. The protests gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” This event features first-person accounts of the events in Birmingham that spring, including remarks by those who took part in the children’s protest, as well as student leaders of a boycott of segregated businesses. The discussion took place at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. 

1963 Birmingham Civil Rights Campaign
Saturday, May 4, 2013     

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham civil rights campaign. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his famed “Letter from Birmingham Jail” after being arrested for taking part in the protests. The campaign gained national attention after local officials used dogs and water cannons on kids after they took to the streets in what was known as the “Children’s Crusade.” A panel of authors and historians recall the turmoil of the time, as well as how Birmingham has chosen to remember its past. This event was part of the Alabama Historical Association’s annual conference.

Legacy of Robert Kennedy and the 1968 Campaign
Saturday, June 5, 2010     

In March 1968, Robert Kennedy challenged incumbent President Lyndon Johnson for the Democratic Party nomination. Less than three months later, Kennedy was assassinated. 40 years later, friends and aides of Robert Kennedy gathered at the Kennedy Presidential Library to talk about the campaign.

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Monday     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
Sundays at Eight - New Book
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org