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Richard Nixon 1969 Presidential Inauguration

President Nixon's 1969 Inauguration

President Nixon's 1969 Inauguration

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 20, 2013

Richard Nixon's first presidential inauguration took place on January 20, 1969. This film is courtesy of the Senate Recording Studio and Naval Photography Center.

Updated: Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 2:01pm (ET)

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