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Richard Byrd's Race to the North Pole

Richard Byrd (left) and co-pilot Floyd Bennet before their historic flight

Richard Byrd (left) and co-pilot Floyd Bennet before their historic flight

Washington, DC
Sunday, December 1, 2013

In 1926, American aviator Richard Byrd attempted to become the first man to fly over the North Pole. He returned from his flight a national hero, winning a Medal of Honor and launching a career as a famous pilot and explorer. However, over the years numerous experts have questioned the authenticity of Byrd’s flight, and produced evidence that casts doubt on Byrd’s legacy. In this program, author Sheldon Bart examines the life of Richard Byrd, both before and after his historic flight. He argues that Byrd did indeed make it all the way to the North Pole, and that his reputation as an explorer should not be tarnished by his detractors.

Updated: Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 3:05pm (ET)

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