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Revolutionary Women

Courtesy: Massachusetts Historical Society.

Courtesy: Massachusetts Historical Society.

Washington, DC
Sunday, April 27, 2014

Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, and Judith Sargent Murray all contributed to the intellectual life of the American Revolution. A panel of historians discusses their writings, lives and views on politics, equality and the war against Great Britain.   

Updated: Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 2:02pm (ET)

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