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Revolutionary War Military Kidnappings

General Charles Lee, 1780

General Charles Lee, 1780

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 3, 2014

Author Christian McBurney talks about his book “Kidnapping the Enemy,” which chronicles the capture of two high-ranking military officers during the Revolutionary War. When British dragoons in December 1776 kidnapped Major General Charles Lee – then second-in-command of the Continental Army -- they were confident the rebellion would soon be over. But stung by Lee’s kidnapping, the Americans decided to respond with a special operation of their own.

Updated: Monday, August 4, 2014 at 9:49am (ET)

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