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Rethinking the 1964 Election

President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964

Atlanta, Georgia
Sunday, May 11, 2014

President Lyndon B. Johnson won a second term in a 1964 landslide victory over Republican Barry Goldwater. From this year’s Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, a panel of history professors reconsiders the 1964 election, discussing the role of the electorate, the nominees and the political parties.  

Updated: Monday, May 12, 2014 at 9:47am (ET)

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