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Remembering the Civil War

Richmond, Virginia
Saturday, October 19, 2013

Author and Purdue University history professor Caroline Janney talks about her book, “Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation.” She describes how Civil War memory was shaped and influenced by various groups – veterans, government leaders, and women – in late 19th and early 20th century America. The University of Richmond and the Museum of the Confederacy co-hosted this event.

Updated: Monday, October 21, 2013 at 10:52am (ET)

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