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Remembering "Kristallnacht," The Night of Broken Glass

A Jewish shop owner in Berlin cleans up the damage done on

A Jewish shop owner in Berlin cleans up the damage done on "Kristallnacht

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 21, 2013

"Kristallnacht" -- or "The Night of Broken Glass" -- takes its name from the shattered windows of Jewish shops, homes and synagogues attacked by Nazi forces and anti-Semitic mobs across Germany and Austria in November, 1938. In this program recorded at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, we hear from German Ambassador to the U.S. Peter Ammon, as well as three Holocaust survivors who share their memories of Kristallnacht on its 75th anniversary.

Updated: Friday, January 3, 2014 at 11:48am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)
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